History

Our Roots

On a cold October afternoon in 1877 a young man named Hugh Paterson drove a horse team and democrat wagon along a rutted trail in western Manitoba. At nightfall he lit a campfire and huddled under a buffalo robe, listening to the coyotes and wondering if the north wind was going to bring snow. He was only 21 years old and a long way from home, but he was nevertheless pleased about his prospects. His wagon was loaded with tea, sugar, and other food staples, and he was looking forward to doing some business in the pioneer communities along the trail.

Like most of the settlers in pioneer Manitoba, H.S. Paterson had come to the prairies with very little money and lots of dreams. He had first become interested in Manitoba when he worked as a grain merchant in Oshawa, Ontario. Paterson merchandised the first wheat shipment from Manitoba farms, and thought it was “the dirtiest wheat I ever saw, but also the best.” He used a fanning mill to shake out the pigweed and wild mustard seeds, and after he’d cleaned up the wheat he was even more impressed. He gave the grain to the local farmers to use as seed, in the hope that they might grow wheat of similar quality, but of course they couldn’t reproduce Manitoba’s dependable sunshine and rich alluvial soil. “Right then I made up my mind,” Paterson later told a newspaper reporter, “that I was going to the place where that wheat came from.”

The next year he arrived in the rough, mud-caked pioneer settlement of Winnipeg, bought some trade goods, and headed off with his wagon to seek his fortune. The great plains of Manitoba were still wild and unsettled. A few remnant herds of buffalo still roamed the prairie, as did the plains Indians whose ancient culture was based on the animals. The year before, on the south side of the international border, a cavalry troop of 262 soldiers and scouts under the command of George Armstrong Custer had been wiped out by a legion of warriors led by Sitting Bull. When Hugh Paterson arrived in the village of Portage la Prairie, he saw throngs of gaunt Lakota refugees who had fled the retribution of the United States Army. Hugh Paterson was arriving at a pivotal time in history of the west. In the next two decades, the wild prairie would disappear, replaced by grain crops stretching all the way to the Rockies.

Paterson did some trading in Portage la Prairie and established a small store there. He soon met a young lady named Ella Snider, and they married in 1881. Two years later they celebrated the birth of their first child, a healthy boy they named Norman M. Paterson. Hugh Paterson loved trading in grain, and in 1888 he was admitted as a member of the fledgling organization called The Winnipeg Grain and Produce Exchange.

It was an exciting time for anyone involved in the grain trade. The Canadian Pacific Railway had just been completed, and the new railroad allowed farmers to ship their grain to booming markets in Europe and other destinations around the world.

Thanks to the railroad, the rich farmlands of western Canada would soon become “the bread basket of the world.”

Our Roots

On a cold October afternoon in 1877 a young man named Hugh Paterson drove a horse team and democrat wagon along a rutted trail in western Manitoba. At nightfall he lit a campfire and huddled under a buffalo robe, listening to the coyotes and wondering if the north wind was going to bring snow. He was only 21 years old and a long way from home, but he was nevertheless pleased about his prospects. His wagon was loaded with tea, sugar, and other food staples, and he was looking forward to doing some business in the pioneer communities along the trail.

Like most of the settlers in pioneer Manitoba, H.S. Paterson had come to the prairies with very little money and lots of dreams. He had first become interested in Manitoba when he worked as a grain merchant in Oshawa, Ontario. Paterson merchandised the first wheat shipment from Manitoba farms, and thought it was “the dirtiest wheat I ever saw, but also the best.” He used a fanning mill to shake out the pigweed and wild mustard seeds, and after he’d cleaned up the wheat he was even more impressed. He gave the grain to the local farmers to use as seed, in the hope that they might grow wheat of similar quality, but of course they couldn’t reproduce Manitoba’s dependable sunshine and rich alluvial soil. “Right then I made up my mind,” Paterson later told a newspaper reporter, “that I was going to the place where that wheat came from.”

The next year he arrived in the rough, mud-caked pioneer settlement of Winnipeg, bought some trade goods, and headed off with his wagon to seek his fortune. The great plains of Manitoba were still wild and unsettled. A few remnant herds of buffalo still roamed the prairie, as did the plains Indians whose ancient culture was based on the animals. The year before, on the south side of the international border, a cavalry troop of 262 soldiers and scouts under the command of George Armstrong Custer had been wiped out by a legion of warriors led by Sitting Bull. When Hugh Paterson arrived in the village of Portage la Prairie, he saw throngs of gaunt Lakota refugees who had fled the retribution of the United States Army. Hugh Paterson was arriving at a pivotal time in history of the west. In the next two decades, the wild prairie would disappear, replaced by grain crops stretching all the way to the Rockies.

Paterson did some trading in Portage la Prairie and established a small store there. He soon met a young lady named Ella Snider, and they married in 1881. Two years later they celebrated the birth of their first child, a healthy boy they named Norman M. Paterson. Hugh Paterson loved trading in grain, and in 1888 he was admitted as a member of the fledgling organization called The Winnipeg Grain and Produce Exchange.

It was an exciting time for anyone involved in the grain trade. The Canadian Pacific Railway had just been completed, and the new railroad allowed farmers to ship their grain to booming markets in Europe and other destinations around the world.

Thanks to the railroad, the rich farmlands of western Canada would soon become “the bread basket of the world.”

Planting Seeds

Hugh Paterson’s son Norman McLeod Paterson inherited his father’s love of agriculture and grain. When he reached adolescence, young Norman Paterson followed in his dad’s footsteps by joining the Winnipeg Grain Exchange and working as a broker.

In 1908, Norman Paterson traveled to the Lake Superior port of Fort William. With little cash but supreme optimism, he convinced a banker to lend him money to buy a carload of grain, which he promptly sold for a modest profit. This transaction encouraged him to become an independent broker, facilitating the movement of grain from the field to markets around the world. He incorporated and rented an office, and the company that would eventually become Paterson GlobalFoods was born.

As Norman Paterson’s reputation for honesty and boundless energy grew, he won the support of Fort William bankers, and they helped him finance the construction of a small elevator. After his father Hugh retired from the grain business in 1911, Norman opened an office in the Winnipeg Grain Exchange, which was now regarded as the most important grain market in the world. Norman’s business kept growing and he kept ploughing the proceeds back into the company. By the end of the 1920s, Norman had established 107 wooden elevators across the west, all of them wearing the distinctive “P” that would eventually become so familiar to travellers on the prairies.

To make the journey from farm gate to foreign markets more efficient, Paterson began buying steamships, and naming them after the cities and provinces of Canada. At enormous expense (and at considerable financial risk) he also built 17 “canallers” in England. His boldness paid off, and by the end of the 1920s, Paterson Steamships was a well-known and respected firm in both Canada and Britain.

The great stock market crash of 1929 left the economies of the U.S.A. and Canada in ruins. But the economies of Europe and other parts of the world were not as severely affected. Even though business was rough, people still had to eat, and Paterson was able to maintain his clients abroad. “The depression really didn’t affect us that much,” said Paterson. “The demand was there.”

By the end of the 1930s however, bigger problems were brewing.

Planting Seeds

Hugh Paterson’s son Norman McLeod Paterson inherited his father’s love of agriculture and grain. When he reached adolescence, young Norman Paterson followed in his dad’s footsteps by joining the Winnipeg Grain Exchange and working as a broker.

In 1908, Norman Paterson traveled to the Lake Superior port of Fort William. With little cash but supreme optimism, he convinced a banker to lend him money to buy a carload of grain, which he promptly sold for a modest profit. This transaction encouraged him to become an independent broker, facilitating the movement of grain from the field to markets around the world. He incorporated and rented an office, and the company that would eventually become Paterson GlobalFoods was born.

As Norman Paterson’s reputation for honesty and boundless energy grew, he won the support of Fort William bankers, and they helped him finance the construction of a small elevator. After his father Hugh retired from the grain business in 1911, Norman opened an office in the Winnipeg Grain Exchange, which was now regarded as the most important grain market in the world. Norman’s business kept growing and he kept ploughing the proceeds back into the company. By the end of the 1920s, Norman had established 107 wooden elevators across the west, all of them wearing the distinctive “P” that would eventually become so familiar to travellers on the prairies.

To make the journey from farm gate to foreign markets more efficient, Paterson began buying steamships, and naming them after the cities and provinces of Canada. At enormous expense (and at considerable financial risk) he also built 17 “canallers” in England. His boldness paid off, and by the end of the 1920s, Paterson Steamships was a well-known and respected firm in both Canada and Britain.

The great stock market crash of 1929 left the economies of the U.S.A. and Canada in ruins. But the economies of Europe and other parts of the world were not as severely affected. Even though business was rough, people still had to eat, and Paterson was able to maintain his clients abroad. “The depression really didn’t affect us that much,” said Paterson. “The demand was there.”

By the end of the 1930s however, bigger problems were brewing.

Planting Seeds

Hugh Paterson’s son Norman McLeod Paterson inherited his father’s love of agriculture and grain. When he reached adolescence, young Norman Paterson followed in his dad’s footsteps by joining the Winnipeg Grain Exchange and working as a broker.

In 1908, Norman Paterson traveled to the Lake Superior port of Fort William. With little cash but supreme optimism, he convinced a banker to lend him money to buy a carload of grain, which he promptly sold for a modest profit. This transaction encouraged him to become an independent broker, facilitating the movement of grain from the field to markets around the world. He incorporated and rented an office, and the company that would eventually become Paterson GlobalFoods was born.

As Norman Paterson’s reputation for honesty and boundless energy grew, he won the support of Fort William bankers, and they helped him finance the construction of a small elevator. After his father Hugh retired from the grain business in 1911, Norman opened an office in the Winnipeg Grain Exchange, which was now regarded as the most important grain market in the world. Norman’s business kept growing and he kept ploughing the proceeds back into the company. By the end of the 1920s, Norman had established 107 wooden elevators across the west, all of them wearing the distinctive “P” that would eventually become so familiar to travellers on the prairies.

To make the journey from farm gate to foreign markets more efficient, Paterson began buying steamships, and naming them after the cities and provinces of Canada. At enormous expense (and at considerable financial risk) he also built 17 “canallers” in England. His boldness paid off, and by the end of the 1920s, Paterson Steamships was a well-known and respected firm in both Canada and Britain.

The great stock market crash of 1929 left the economies of the U.S.A. and Canada in ruins. But the economies of Europe and other parts of the world were not as severely affected. Even though business was rough, people still had to eat, and Paterson was able to maintain his clients abroad. “The depression really didn’t affect us that much,” said Paterson. “The demand was there.”

By the end of the 1930s however, bigger problems were brewing.

Planting Seeds

Hugh Paterson’s son Norman McLeod Paterson inherited his father’s love of agriculture and grain. When he reached adolescence, young Norman Paterson followed in his dad’s footsteps by joining the Winnipeg Grain Exchange and working as a broker.

In 1908, Norman Paterson traveled to the Lake Superior port of Fort William. With little cash but supreme optimism, he convinced a banker to lend him money to buy a carload of grain, which he promptly sold for a modest profit. This transaction encouraged him to become an independent broker, facilitating the movement of grain from the field to markets around the world. He incorporated and rented an office, and the company that would eventually become Paterson GlobalFoods was born.

As Norman Paterson’s reputation for honesty and boundless energy grew, he won the support of Fort William bankers, and they helped him finance the construction of a small elevator. After his father Hugh retired from the grain business in 1911, Norman opened an office in the Winnipeg Grain Exchange, which was now regarded as the most important grain market in the world. Norman’s business kept growing and he kept ploughing the proceeds back into the company. By the end of the 1920s, Norman had established 107 wooden elevators across the west, all of them wearing the distinctive “P” that would eventually become so familiar to travellers on the prairies.

To make the journey from farm gate to foreign markets more efficient, Paterson began buying steamships, and naming them after the cities and provinces of Canada. At enormous expense (and at considerable financial risk) he also built 17 “canallers” in England. His boldness paid off, and by the end of the 1920s, Paterson Steamships was a well-known and respected firm in both Canada and Britain.

The great stock market crash of 1929 left the economies of the U.S.A. and Canada in ruins. But the economies of Europe and other parts of the world were not as severely affected. Even though business was rough, people still had to eat, and Paterson was able to maintain his clients abroad. “The depression really didn’t affect us that much,” said Paterson. “The demand was there.”

By the end of the 1930s however, bigger problems were brewing.

Planting Seeds

Hugh Paterson’s son Norman McLeod Paterson inherited his father’s love of agriculture and grain. When he reached adolescence, young Norman Paterson followed in his dad’s footsteps by joining the Winnipeg Grain Exchange and working as a broker.

In 1908, Norman Paterson traveled to the Lake Superior port of Fort William. With little cash but supreme optimism, he convinced a banker to lend him money to buy a carload of grain, which he promptly sold for a modest profit. This transaction encouraged him to become an independent broker, facilitating the movement of grain from the field to markets around the world. He incorporated and rented an office, and the company that would eventually become Paterson GlobalFoods was born.

As Norman Paterson’s reputation for honesty and boundless energy grew, he won the support of Fort William bankers, and they helped him finance the construction of a small elevator. After his father Hugh retired from the grain business in 1911, Norman opened an office in the Winnipeg Grain Exchange, which was now regarded as the most important grain market in the world. Norman’s business kept growing and he kept ploughing the proceeds back into the company. By the end of the 1920s, Norman had established 107 wooden elevators across the west, all of them wearing the distinctive “P” that would eventually become so familiar to travellers on the prairies.

To make the journey from farm gate to foreign markets more efficient, Paterson began buying steamships, and naming them after the cities and provinces of Canada. At enormous expense (and at considerable financial risk) he also built 17 “canallers” in England. His boldness paid off, and by the end of the 1920s, Paterson Steamships was a well-known and respected firm in both Canada and Britain.

The great stock market crash of 1929 left the economies of the U.S.A. and Canada in ruins. But the economies of Europe and other parts of the world were not as severely affected. Even though business was rough, people still had to eat, and Paterson was able to maintain his clients abroad. “The depression really didn’t affect us that much,” said Paterson. “The demand was there.”

By the end of the 1930s however, bigger problems were brewing.

Planting Seeds

Hugh Paterson’s son Norman McLeod Paterson inherited his father’s love of agriculture and grain. When he reached adolescence, young Norman Paterson followed in his dad’s footsteps by joining the Winnipeg Grain Exchange and working as a broker.

In 1908, Norman Paterson traveled to the Lake Superior port of Fort William. With little cash but supreme optimism, he convinced a banker to lend him money to buy a carload of grain, which he promptly sold for a modest profit. This transaction encouraged him to become an independent broker, facilitating the movement of grain from the field to markets around the world. He incorporated and rented an office, and the company that would eventually become Paterson GlobalFoods was born.

As Norman Paterson’s reputation for honesty and boundless energy grew, he won the support of Fort William bankers, and they helped him finance the construction of a small elevator. After his father Hugh retired from the grain business in 1911, Norman opened an office in the Winnipeg Grain Exchange, which was now regarded as the most important grain market in the world. Norman’s business kept growing and he kept ploughing the proceeds back into the company. By the end of the 1920s, Norman had established 107 wooden elevators across the west, all of them wearing the distinctive “P” that would eventually become so familiar to travellers on the prairies.

To make the journey from farm gate to foreign markets more efficient, Paterson began buying steamships, and naming them after the cities and provinces of Canada. At enormous expense (and at considerable financial risk) he also built 17 “canallers” in England. His boldness paid off, and by the end of the 1920s, Paterson Steamships was a well-known and respected firm in both Canada and Britain.

The great stock market crash of 1929 left the economies of the U.S.A. and Canada in ruins. But the economies of Europe and other parts of the world were not as severely affected. Even though business was rough, people still had to eat, and Paterson was able to maintain his clients abroad. “The depression really didn’t affect us that much,” said Paterson. “The demand was there.”

By the end of the 1930s however, bigger problems were brewing.

Called to War

In September 1939 Canada joined the forces of freedom in the battle against Nazi Germany. Without hesitation Norman McLeod Paterson cabled the Federal Government and offered himself and his ships for the war effort. The offer was accepted immediately and in no time Paterson made the transition from the grain business to the war effort.

During the Second World War, 20 Paterson ships hauled bauxite (aluminum ore for war production) from British Guiana to Alabama, served on convoy duty in the north Atlantic, and took part in the cross-channel invasion of Normandy on D-Day. Fifty-eight men and 15 ships were lost in hostile waters during the war, a great loss to the close-knit company.

Although he was too old to volunteer for combat, Norman Paterson was drafted into service by the Prime Minister himself. In February, 1940 he received a telephone call from C.D. Howe, the so-called “Minister of Everything,” who told him “Well, we have another job for you. The Prime Minister wants you to be a senator.”

Senator Paterson was sworn in on May 16, 1940, and he and his family moved to Ottawa after donating their home to the local hospital. During the war he worked tirelessly for the Allied cause, using his expertise to tackle many problems. Prairie farmers were in difficulty because Atlantic shipping was dedicated to the war effort so there was no way to deliver grain to international markets. Senator Paterson helped devise a system by which farmers could stay productive and support their families. His company built a network of “Distress Storage Annexes” across the prairies for grain that couldn’t be transported. The Canadian Wheat Board (which was established in 1935) paid storage fees to Paterson’s company to warehouse the grain, and his company passed these funds on to farmers as advance payments on future sales. The Annexes kept the grain safe and dry, and when it was shipped to market years later it was as good as the day it was harvested.

Senator Paterson also gave his blessing to his two sons, Donald and John, to volunteer for the Royal Canadian Air Force. Both saw heavy combat. Donald Paterson served as the skipper of a Lancaster bomber and John as the pilot of a Spitfire fighter. At a time when the life expectancy of a Lancaster crewman was 10 or 12 missions Donald survived 29 flights over enemy territory, five of them over the most hazardous target in the Reich — Berlin. At the stick of his Spitfire John shot down three enemy fighters in heated aerial battles, and Donald was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for “skill, fortitude and devotion to duty” at the helm of his Lancaster.

In 1944 John returned to Canada, completed a law degree, and joined the steamship division in 1947. Late in 1945, Donald returned to civilian life and joined the Winnipeg office, assuming duties in the grain division. Only five of the company’s 20 canal ships had been returned after the war and little compensation was provided for the lost vessels. It was a time of great difficulty for the company, but by acquiring some old canal boats, rehabilitating others, and buying new ones when they could, the Senator and his sons managed to restore the fleet to its pre-war status by 1960.

Called to War

In September 1939 Canada joined the forces of freedom in the battle against Nazi Germany. Without hesitation Norman McLeod Paterson cabled the Federal Government and offered himself and his ships for the war effort. The offer was accepted immediately and in no time Paterson made the transition from the grain business to the war effort.

During the Second World War, 20 Paterson ships hauled bauxite (aluminum ore for war production) from British Guiana to Alabama, served on convoy duty in the north Atlantic, and took part in the cross-channel invasion of Normandy on D-Day. Fifty-eight men and 15 ships were lost in hostile waters during the war, a great loss to the close-knit company.

Although he was too old to volunteer for combat, Norman Paterson was drafted into service by the Prime Minister himself. In February, 1940 he received a telephone call from C.D. Howe, the so-called “Minister of Everything,” who told him “Well, we have another job for you. The Prime Minister wants you to be a senator.”

Senator Paterson was sworn in on May 16, 1940, and he and his family moved to Ottawa after donating their home to the local hospital. During the war he worked tirelessly for the Allied cause, using his expertise to tackle many problems. Prairie farmers were in difficulty because Atlantic shipping was dedicated to the war effort so there was no way to deliver grain to international markets. Senator Paterson helped devise a system by which farmers could stay productive and support their families. His company built a network of “Distress Storage Annexes” across the prairies for grain that couldn’t be transported. The Canadian Wheat Board (which was established in 1935) paid storage fees to Paterson’s company to warehouse the grain, and his company passed these funds on to farmers as advance payments on future sales. The Annexes kept the grain safe and dry, and when it was shipped to market years later it was as good as the day it was harvested.

Senator Paterson also gave his blessing to his two sons, Donald and John, to volunteer for the Royal Canadian Air Force. Both saw heavy combat. Donald Paterson served as the skipper of a Lancaster bomber and John as the pilot of a Spitfire fighter. At a time when the life expectancy of a Lancaster crewman was 10 or 12 missions Donald survived 29 flights over enemy territory, five of them over the most hazardous target in the Reich — Berlin. At the stick of his Spitfire John shot down three enemy fighters in heated aerial battles, and Donald was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for “skill, fortitude and devotion to duty” at the helm of his Lancaster.

In 1944 John returned to Canada, completed a law degree, and joined the steamship division in 1947. Late in 1945, Donald returned to civilian life and joined the Winnipeg office, assuming duties in the grain division. Only five of the company’s 20 canal ships had been returned after the war and little compensation was provided for the lost vessels. It was a time of great difficulty for the company, but by acquiring some old canal boats, rehabilitating others, and buying new ones when they could, the Senator and his sons managed to restore the fleet to its pre-war status by 1960.

Called to War

In September 1939 Canada joined the forces of freedom in the battle against Nazi Germany. Without hesitation Norman McLeod Paterson cabled the Federal Government and offered himself and his ships for the war effort. The offer was accepted immediately and in no time Paterson made the transition from the grain business to the war effort.

During the Second World War, 20 Paterson ships hauled bauxite (aluminum ore for war production) from British Guiana to Alabama, served on convoy duty in the north Atlantic, and took part in the cross-channel invasion of Normandy on D-Day. Fifty-eight men and 15 ships were lost in hostile waters during the war, a great loss to the close-knit company.

Although he was too old to volunteer for combat, Norman Paterson was drafted into service by the Prime Minister himself. In February, 1940 he received a telephone call from C.D. Howe, the so-called “Minister of Everything,” who told him “Well, we have another job for you. The Prime Minister wants you to be a senator.”

Senator Paterson was sworn in on May 16, 1940, and he and his family moved to Ottawa after donating their home to the local hospital. During the war he worked tirelessly for the Allied cause, using his expertise to tackle many problems. Prairie farmers were in difficulty because Atlantic shipping was dedicated to the war effort so there was no way to deliver grain to international markets. Senator Paterson helped devise a system by which farmers could stay productive and support their families. His company built a network of “Distress Storage Annexes” across the prairies for grain that couldn’t be transported. The Canadian Wheat Board (which was established in 1935) paid storage fees to Paterson’s company to warehouse the grain, and his company passed these funds on to farmers as advance payments on future sales. The Annexes kept the grain safe and dry, and when it was shipped to market years later it was as good as the day it was harvested.

Senator Paterson also gave his blessing to his two sons, Donald and John, to volunteer for the Royal Canadian Air Force. Both saw heavy combat. Donald Paterson served as the skipper of a Lancaster bomber and John as the pilot of a Spitfire fighter. At a time when the life expectancy of a Lancaster crewman was 10 or 12 missions Donald survived 29 flights over enemy territory, five of them over the most hazardous target in the Reich — Berlin. At the stick of his Spitfire John shot down three enemy fighters in heated aerial battles, and Donald was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for “skill, fortitude and devotion to duty” at the helm of his Lancaster.

In 1944 John returned to Canada, completed a law degree, and joined the steamship division in 1947. Late in 1945, Donald returned to civilian life and joined the Winnipeg office, assuming duties in the grain division. Only five of the company’s 20 canal ships had been returned after the war and little compensation was provided for the lost vessels. It was a time of great difficulty for the company, but by acquiring some old canal boats, rehabilitating others, and buying new ones when they could, the Senator and his sons managed to restore the fleet to its pre-war status by 1960.

Called to War

In September 1939 Canada joined the forces of freedom in the battle against Nazi Germany. Without hesitation Norman McLeod Paterson cabled the Federal Government and offered himself and his ships for the war effort. The offer was accepted immediately and in no time Paterson made the transition from the grain business to the war effort.

During the Second World War, 20 Paterson ships hauled bauxite (aluminum ore for war production) from British Guiana to Alabama, served on convoy duty in the north Atlantic, and took part in the cross-channel invasion of Normandy on D-Day. Fifty-eight men and 15 ships were lost in hostile waters during the war, a great loss to the close-knit company.

Although he was too old to volunteer for combat, Norman Paterson was drafted into service by the Prime Minister himself. In February, 1940 he received a telephone call from C.D. Howe, the so-called “Minister of Everything,” who told him “Well, we have another job for you. The Prime Minister wants you to be a senator.”

Senator Paterson was sworn in on May 16, 1940, and he and his family moved to Ottawa after donating their home to the local hospital. During the war he worked tirelessly for the Allied cause, using his expertise to tackle many problems. Prairie farmers were in difficulty because Atlantic shipping was dedicated to the war effort so there was no way to deliver grain to international markets. Senator Paterson helped devise a system by which farmers could stay productive and support their families. His company built a network of “Distress Storage Annexes” across the prairies for grain that couldn’t be transported. The Canadian Wheat Board (which was established in 1935) paid storage fees to Paterson’s company to warehouse the grain, and his company passed these funds on to farmers as advance payments on future sales. The Annexes kept the grain safe and dry, and when it was shipped to market years later it was as good as the day it was harvested.

Senator Paterson also gave his blessing to his two sons, Donald and John, to volunteer for the Royal Canadian Air Force. Both saw heavy combat. Donald Paterson served as the skipper of a Lancaster bomber and John as the pilot of a Spitfire fighter. At a time when the life expectancy of a Lancaster crewman was 10 or 12 missions Donald survived 29 flights over enemy territory, five of them over the most hazardous target in the Reich — Berlin. At the stick of his Spitfire John shot down three enemy fighters in heated aerial battles, and Donald was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for “skill, fortitude and devotion to duty” at the helm of his Lancaster.

In 1944 John returned to Canada, completed a law degree, and joined the steamship division in 1947. Late in 1945, Donald returned to civilian life and joined the Winnipeg office, assuming duties in the grain division. Only five of the company’s 20 canal ships had been returned after the war and little compensation was provided for the lost vessels. It was a time of great difficulty for the company, but by acquiring some old canal boats, rehabilitating others, and buying new ones when they could, the Senator and his sons managed to restore the fleet to its pre-war status by 1960.

Called to War

In September 1939 Canada joined the forces of freedom in the battle against Nazi Germany. Without hesitation Norman McLeod Paterson cabled the Federal Government and offered himself and his ships for the war effort. The offer was accepted immediately and in no time Paterson made the transition from the grain business to the war effort.

During the Second World War, 20 Paterson ships hauled bauxite (aluminum ore for war production) from British Guiana to Alabama, served on convoy duty in the north Atlantic, and took part in the cross-channel invasion of Normandy on D-Day. Fifty-eight men and 15 ships were lost in hostile waters during the war, a great loss to the close-knit company.

Although he was too old to volunteer for combat, Norman Paterson was drafted into service by the Prime Minister himself. In February, 1940 he received a telephone call from C.D. Howe, the so-called “Minister of Everything,” who told him “Well, we have another job for you. The Prime Minister wants you to be a senator.”

Senator Paterson was sworn in on May 16, 1940, and he and his family moved to Ottawa after donating their home to the local hospital. During the war he worked tirelessly for the Allied cause, using his expertise to tackle many problems. Prairie farmers were in difficulty because Atlantic shipping was dedicated to the war effort so there was no way to deliver grain to international markets. Senator Paterson helped devise a system by which farmers could stay productive and support their families. His company built a network of “Distress Storage Annexes” across the prairies for grain that couldn’t be transported. The Canadian Wheat Board (which was established in 1935) paid storage fees to Paterson’s company to warehouse the grain, and his company passed these funds on to farmers as advance payments on future sales. The Annexes kept the grain safe and dry, and when it was shipped to market years later it was as good as the day it was harvested.

Senator Paterson also gave his blessing to his two sons, Donald and John, to volunteer for the Royal Canadian Air Force. Both saw heavy combat. Donald Paterson served as the skipper of a Lancaster bomber and John as the pilot of a Spitfire fighter. At a time when the life expectancy of a Lancaster crewman was 10 or 12 missions Donald survived 29 flights over enemy territory, five of them over the most hazardous target in the Reich — Berlin. At the stick of his Spitfire John shot down three enemy fighters in heated aerial battles, and Donald was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for “skill, fortitude and devotion to duty” at the helm of his Lancaster.

In 1944 John returned to Canada, completed a law degree, and joined the steamship division in 1947. Late in 1945, Donald returned to civilian life and joined the Winnipeg office, assuming duties in the grain division. Only five of the company’s 20 canal ships had been returned after the war and little compensation was provided for the lost vessels. It was a time of great difficulty for the company, but by acquiring some old canal boats, rehabilitating others, and buying new ones when they could, the Senator and his sons managed to restore the fleet to its pre-war status by 1960.

Time to Grow

After John and Don Paterson joined their father’s firm, the company adopted a new name — N.M. Paterson and Sons, Ltd.

Donald Paterson became Vice President of the Grain Division in Winnipeg, and John Paterson became Vice President in charge of the Steamship Division in Fort William. Senator Paterson remained President of the company.

The western grain network was booming. Farmers were mechanizing, becoming more efficient, and producing greater harvests, and N.M. Paterson and Sons stimulated the boom by pouring development money and personnel into centres of high activity on the prairies. New annexes and second elevators were built at key locations, and by 1960, the company’s Winnipeg-based grain division was handling about twice as much grain as it did in the 1930s.

All this growth didn’t come without challenges. The construction of the St. Lawrence Seaway opened up the Great Lakes shipping route for larger, deeper more expensive boats. The Seaway was a toll route, in which small vessels were charged as much as large vessels, and these new costs upset the old economies of scale. Shipping companies had to cope with the harsh, age-old reality of evolution — adapt or die — and N.M. Paterson and Sons rose to the task. With characteristic boldness, the company sold off its older obsolete boats and replaced them with state-of-the art vessels like the S.S. Paterson — 574 feet in length — and the Senator of Canada, which measured 604 feet and carried over 15,000 tons of grain. During the 1960s, the company consisted of 40 vessels, the second largest fleet on the Great Lakes, and hauled millions of tons of grain, iron, newsprint, gypsum, and copper.

In the west, N.M. Paterson and Sons also launched subsidiary companies like Canadian Protein Pellets, which manufactured alfalfa-based pelletized animal feed in Alberta and shipped it to markets in Japan. Another subsidiary was Great West Coal, based in Bienfait, Saskatchewan. Underground coal mining was a dangerous and difficult business in the early days of the 20th century but after World War II, large excavating machines became available and it was no longer necessary to go underground. N.M. Paterson and Sons strip-mined coal at Bienfait with the biggest dragline in Canada — an enormous crawler shovel named Mister Klimax. With a bucket that was large enough to hold a truck, Mister Klimax did the backbreaking work of a hundred miners. Some of the coal produced by Great West Coal was distributed to Paterson grain elevators (and to Paterson’s competitors) across Manitoba and Saskatchewan, where farmers and local people could purchase it for heating fuel.

With the introduction of machines like Mister Klimax, miners could work in safety, and black lung disease became a thing of the past. Saskatchewan’s strip mines also resulted in creating social and environmental benefits. After being depleted of their coal, some of the larger sites were converted into wetlands for wildlife.

Another subsidiary, Northwest Design and Fabrication Ltd., manufactured camper trailers, mobile homes and boats. Originally based in Winnipeg, this small manufacturing company grew as Paterson purchased a large American modular housing firm called Commodore. The company became the largest manufacturer of mobile homes and motor homes in Canada in the 1970s and had four manufacturing plants across the nation. Paterson’s manufacturing arm was eventually sold to allow the company to continue to grow its core operations.

Time to Grow

After John and Don Paterson joined their father’s firm, the company adopted a new name — N.M. Paterson and Sons, Ltd.

Donald Paterson became Vice President of the Grain Division in Winnipeg, and John Paterson became Vice President in charge of the Steamship Division in Fort William. Senator Paterson remained President of the company.

The western grain network was booming. Farmers were mechanizing, becoming more efficient, and producing greater harvests, and N.M. Paterson and Sons stimulated the boom by pouring development money and personnel into centres of high activity on the prairies. New annexes and second elevators were built at key locations, and by 1960, the company’s Winnipeg-based grain division was handling about twice as much grain as it did in the 1930s.

All this growth didn’t come without challenges. The construction of the St. Lawrence Seaway opened up the Great Lakes shipping route for larger, deeper more expensive boats. The Seaway was a toll route, in which small vessels were charged as much as large vessels, and these new costs upset the old economies of scale. Shipping companies had to cope with the harsh, age-old reality of evolution — adapt or die — and N.M. Paterson and Sons rose to the task. With characteristic boldness, the company sold off its older obsolete boats and replaced them with state-of-the art vessels like the S.S. Paterson — 574 feet in length — and the Senator of Canada, which measured 604 feet and carried over 15,000 tons of grain. During the 1960s, the company consisted of 40 vessels, the second largest fleet on the Great Lakes, and hauled millions of tons of grain, iron, newsprint, gypsum, and copper.

In the west, N.M. Paterson and Sons also launched subsidiary companies like Canadian Protein Pellets, which manufactured alfalfa-based pelletized animal feed in Alberta and shipped it to markets in Japan. Another subsidiary was Great West Coal, based in Bienfait, Saskatchewan. Underground coal mining was a dangerous and difficult business in the early days of the 20th century but after World War II, large excavating machines became available and it was no longer necessary to go underground. N.M. Paterson and Sons strip-mined coal at Bienfait with the biggest dragline in Canada — an enormous crawler shovel named Mister Klimax. With a bucket that was large enough to hold a truck, Mister Klimax did the backbreaking work of a hundred miners. Some of the coal produced by Great West Coal was distributed to Paterson grain elevators (and to Paterson’s competitors) across Manitoba and Saskatchewan, where farmers and local people could purchase it for heating fuel.

With the introduction of machines like Mister Klimax, miners could work in safety, and black lung disease became a thing of the past. Saskatchewan’s strip mines also resulted in creating social and environmental benefits. After being depleted of their coal, some of the larger sites were converted into wetlands for wildlife.

Another subsidiary, Northwest Design and Fabrication Ltd., manufactured camper trailers, mobile homes and boats. Originally based in Winnipeg, this small manufacturing company grew as Paterson purchased a large American modular housing firm called Commodore. The company became the largest manufacturer of mobile homes and motor homes in Canada in the 1970s and had four manufacturing plants across the nation. Paterson’s manufacturing arm was eventually sold to allow the company to continue to grow its core operations.

New Leadership

On August 11, 1983, eight days after his 100th birthday, Senator Paterson died peacefully in Ottawa. (His son John fell ill with cancer and predeceased him in 1981.) Norman’s passing was a great loss to the Canadian business world, and the Mayor of Thunder Bay expressed the thoughts of many in describing him as one of “the great captains of industry in this country.” Norman Paterson was also a devoted philanthropist, and one of his most important gifts was the Paterson Foundation, a private charity he established in 1970 to support worthwhile community projects in health care, social welfare, and education. When Senator Paterson died he left his entire estate to the Paterson Foundation, so he still contributes to the wellbeing of communities in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Northwestern Ontario.

In the spring of 1985 the pride of the fleet was launched. Fittingly, it was named after him. The M.V. Paterson had an overall length of over 736 feet, a beam of almost 76 feet, and a maximum capacity of 32,350 tons. It was the largest ship navigating the full seaway, and it carried record-sized shipments of grain to St. Lawrence River ports such as Montreal and Baie Comeau.

But more upsets were brewing in the market. In the late 1980s the Soviet Union defaulted on its loans and collapsed, taking down a large part of the foreign grain market. In Canada, the flow of export grain shifted from east to west, and the Port of Vancouver became more important than Thunder Bay. In Winnipeg, Don Paterson dealt with the changing international grain market by emphasizing western operations — increasing the capacity of strategic elevators throughout the western network and installing new equipment to handle larger and more diverse crops. One of the more radical innovations in the grain industry was the futuristic-looking “double-legged high throughput elevator,” which enabled handlers to receive and load grain simultaneously at high speed.

His son Andrew B. Paterson had by now joined the family firm, and he was proving to be an aggressive innovator. Grain on its way to foreign markets had always been cleaned at the seaport, and the farmers had been charged for the service. Andrew saw the opportunity to further integrate the company and provide higher profits to farmers by building cleaning facilities right on the prairies. The first “inland export terminal” opened in 1992 in Indian Head, Saskatchewan, with all the celebration associated with Paterson grand openings. In almost every year that followed, new Paterson export terminals opened across the west, and these ultra-modern structures soon became part of the new prairie landscape.

New Leadership

On August 11, 1983, eight days after his 100th birthday, Senator Paterson died peacefully in Ottawa. (His son John fell ill with cancer and predeceased him in 1981.) Norman’s passing was a great loss to the Canadian business world, and the Mayor of Thunder Bay expressed the thoughts of many in describing him as one of “the great captains of industry in this country.” Norman Paterson was also a devoted philanthropist, and one of his most important gifts was the Paterson Foundation, a private charity he established in 1970 to support worthwhile community projects in health care, social welfare, and education. When Senator Paterson died he left his entire estate to the Paterson Foundation, so he still contributes to the wellbeing of communities in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Northwestern Ontario.

In the spring of 1985 the pride of the fleet was launched. Fittingly, it was named after him. The M.V. Paterson had an overall length of over 736 feet, a beam of almost 76 feet, and a maximum capacity of 32,350 tons. It was the largest ship navigating the full seaway, and it carried record-sized shipments of grain to St. Lawrence River ports such as Montreal and Baie Comeau.

But more upsets were brewing in the market. In the late 1980s the Soviet Union defaulted on its loans and collapsed, taking down a large part of the foreign grain market. In Canada, the flow of export grain shifted from east to west, and the Port of Vancouver became more important than Thunder Bay. In Winnipeg, Don Paterson dealt with the changing international grain market by emphasizing western operations — increasing the capacity of strategic elevators throughout the western network and installing new equipment to handle larger and more diverse crops. One of the more radical innovations in the grain industry was the futuristic-looking “double-legged high throughput elevator,” which enabled handlers to receive and load grain simultaneously at high speed.

His son Andrew B. Paterson had by now joined the family firm, and he was proving to be an aggressive innovator. Grain on its way to foreign markets had always been cleaned at the seaport, and the farmers had been charged for the service. Andrew saw the opportunity to further integrate the company and provide higher profits to farmers by building cleaning facilities right on the prairies. The first “inland export terminal” opened in 1992 in Indian Head, Saskatchewan, with all the celebration associated with Paterson grand openings. In almost every year that followed, new Paterson export terminals opened across the west, and these ultra-modern structures soon became part of the new prairie landscape.

New Leadership

On August 11, 1983, eight days after his 100th birthday, Senator Paterson died peacefully in Ottawa. (His son John fell ill with cancer and predeceased him in 1981.) Norman’s passing was a great loss to the Canadian business world, and the Mayor of Thunder Bay expressed the thoughts of many in describing him as one of “the great captains of industry in this country.” Norman Paterson was also a devoted philanthropist, and one of his most important gifts was the Paterson Foundation, a private charity he established in 1970 to support worthwhile community projects in health care, social welfare, and education. When Senator Paterson died he left his entire estate to the Paterson Foundation, so he still contributes to the wellbeing of communities in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Northwestern Ontario.

In the spring of 1985 the pride of the fleet was launched. Fittingly, it was named after him. The M.V. Paterson had an overall length of over 736 feet, a beam of almost 76 feet, and a maximum capacity of 32,350 tons. It was the largest ship navigating the full seaway, and it carried record-sized shipments of grain to St. Lawrence River ports such as Montreal and Baie Comeau.

But more upsets were brewing in the market. In the late 1980s the Soviet Union defaulted on its loans and collapsed, taking down a large part of the foreign grain market. In Canada, the flow of export grain shifted from east to west, and the Port of Vancouver became more important than Thunder Bay. In Winnipeg, Don Paterson dealt with the changing international grain market by emphasizing western operations — increasing the capacity of strategic elevators throughout the western network and installing new equipment to handle larger and more diverse crops. One of the more radical innovations in the grain industry was the futuristic-looking “double-legged high throughput elevator,” which enabled handlers to receive and load grain simultaneously at high speed.

His son Andrew B. Paterson had by now joined the family firm, and he was proving to be an aggressive innovator. Grain on its way to foreign markets had always been cleaned at the seaport, and the farmers had been charged for the service. Andrew saw the opportunity to further integrate the company and provide higher profits to farmers by building cleaning facilities right on the prairies. The first “inland export terminal” opened in 1992 in Indian Head, Saskatchewan, with all the celebration associated with Paterson grand openings. In almost every year that followed, new Paterson export terminals opened across the west, and these ultra-modern structures soon became part of the new prairie landscape.

New Leadership

On August 11, 1983, eight days after his 100th birthday, Senator Paterson died peacefully in Ottawa. (His son John fell ill with cancer and predeceased him in 1981.) Norman’s passing was a great loss to the Canadian business world, and the Mayor of Thunder Bay expressed the thoughts of many in describing him as one of “the great captains of industry in this country.” Norman Paterson was also a devoted philanthropist, and one of his most important gifts was the Paterson Foundation, a private charity he established in 1970 to support worthwhile community projects in health care, social welfare, and education. When Senator Paterson died he left his entire estate to the Paterson Foundation, so he still contributes to the wellbeing of communities in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Northwestern Ontario.

In the spring of 1985 the pride of the fleet was launched. Fittingly, it was named after him. The M.V. Paterson had an overall length of over 736 feet, a beam of almost 76 feet, and a maximum capacity of 32,350 tons. It was the largest ship navigating the full seaway, and it carried record-sized shipments of grain to St. Lawrence River ports such as Montreal and Baie Comeau.

But more upsets were brewing in the market. In the late 1980s the Soviet Union defaulted on its loans and collapsed, taking down a large part of the foreign grain market. In Canada, the flow of export grain shifted from east to west, and the Port of Vancouver became more important than Thunder Bay. In Winnipeg, Don Paterson dealt with the changing international grain market by emphasizing western operations — increasing the capacity of strategic elevators throughout the western network and installing new equipment to handle larger and more diverse crops. One of the more radical innovations in the grain industry was the futuristic-looking “double-legged high throughput elevator,” which enabled handlers to receive and load grain simultaneously at high speed.

His son Andrew B. Paterson had by now joined the family firm, and he was proving to be an aggressive innovator. Grain on its way to foreign markets had always been cleaned at the seaport, and the farmers had been charged for the service. Andrew saw the opportunity to further integrate the company and provide higher profits to farmers by building cleaning facilities right on the prairies. The first “inland export terminal” opened in 1992 in Indian Head, Saskatchewan, with all the celebration associated with Paterson grand openings. In almost every year that followed, new Paterson export terminals opened across the west, and these ultra-modern structures soon became part of the new prairie landscape.

New Leadership

On August 11, 1983, eight days after his 100th birthday, Senator Paterson died peacefully in Ottawa. (His son John fell ill with cancer and predeceased him in 1981.) Norman’s passing was a great loss to the Canadian business world, and the Mayor of Thunder Bay expressed the thoughts of many in describing him as one of “the great captains of industry in this country.” Norman Paterson was also a devoted philanthropist, and one of his most important gifts was the Paterson Foundation, a private charity he established in 1970 to support worthwhile community projects in health care, social welfare, and education. When Senator Paterson died he left his entire estate to the Paterson Foundation, so he still contributes to the wellbeing of communities in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Northwestern Ontario.

In the spring of 1985 the pride of the fleet was launched. Fittingly, it was named after him. The M.V. Paterson had an overall length of over 736 feet, a beam of almost 76 feet, and a maximum capacity of 32,350 tons. It was the largest ship navigating the full seaway, and it carried record-sized shipments of grain to St. Lawrence River ports such as Montreal and Baie Comeau.

But more upsets were brewing in the market. In the late 1980s the Soviet Union defaulted on its loans and collapsed, taking down a large part of the foreign grain market. In Canada, the flow of export grain shifted from east to west, and the Port of Vancouver became more important than Thunder Bay. In Winnipeg, Don Paterson dealt with the changing international grain market by emphasizing western operations — increasing the capacity of strategic elevators throughout the western network and installing new equipment to handle larger and more diverse crops. One of the more radical innovations in the grain industry was the futuristic-looking “double-legged high throughput elevator,” which enabled handlers to receive and load grain simultaneously at high speed.

His son Andrew B. Paterson had by now joined the family firm, and he was proving to be an aggressive innovator. Grain on its way to foreign markets had always been cleaned at the seaport, and the farmers had been charged for the service. Andrew saw the opportunity to further integrate the company and provide higher profits to farmers by building cleaning facilities right on the prairies. The first “inland export terminal” opened in 1992 in Indian Head, Saskatchewan, with all the celebration associated with Paterson grand openings. In almost every year that followed, new Paterson export terminals opened across the west, and these ultra-modern structures soon became part of the new prairie landscape.

Into the Future

In 2001, Senator Paterson’s grandson, Andrew B. Paterson took over leadership of the family firm. During his younger years, as he learned the ropes at the grain division, Andrew saw many competitors disappear, swallowed up by large, multi-national companies operating on very high volumes and low margins. As CEO of the company Andrew resolved to take a different approach and differentiate his company from the competition.

Andrew’s vision focuses on the commodity that has always been the lifeblood of the company — grain. Since the bulk of Canada’s grain was now flowing west to Vancouver, Andrew sold the shipping division to Canada Steamship Lines in 2002. This move allowed him to grow the company into a highly integrated conglomerate centred around the production, storage, transportation, refinement and sale of grain.

These subsdiaries are numerous and diversified. One of them, Growers International Organic Sales, participates in the enormous boom in the organic food industry by engaging local growers to develop organic produce, and provides assistance during the transition from conventional to organic farming. Another company, NutraSun Foods Ltd., in Regina, produces organic and conventional flour for sale to health conscious shoppers in Canadian supermarkets.

The Paterson conglomerate also branched out into animal nutrition with the opening of the FeedMax mill in Killarney, Manitoba. The mill produces conventional and certified organic animal feed and is one of the largest feed mills in Western Canada. In 2007 Paterson Grain worked with five other independent grain companies to acquire what is now known as the Alliance Grain Terminal in the port of Vancouver. This acquisition gave the company access to foreign export markets without having to go through a competitor’s facilities.

In 2005, the company’s name was changed to Paterson GlobalFoods Inc. to reflect its bold new international presence. With producers and clients on virtually every continent, Paterson GlobalFoods is now truly a world-wide conglomerate. Andrew’s father, Donald S. Paterson, DFC, passed away on May 24, 2006. After running the grain division for so many years, and serving as the company’s Honorary Chairman after he retired, Donald is sorely missed. But Andrew has proven to be an energetic and decisive CEO, and under his leadership Paterson GlobalFoods, has achieved the remarkable honour of being named one of Canada’s “Best Managed Companies” for the last nine years running.

So now the company has come full circle. Founded a century ago by a hard-working and forward-thinking young man named Norman Paterson, it is now once again in the hands of an energetic young Paterson, one who reminds many people of his grandfather. The future will bring more challenges and change for Paterson GlobalFoods. But with a century of successful growth behind him, Andrew Paterson still takes pride in running the family business by the values, vision and passion of his grandfather, Norman McLeod Paterson.

Our Inland Terminals

  • Assiniboia, Saskatchewan
  • Winnipeg North, Manitoba
  • Morris, Manitoba
  • Killarney, Manitoba
  • Binscarth, Manitoba
  • Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • Swift Current, Saskatchewan
  • Dunmore, Alberta
  • Gleichen, Alberta

Our Port Terminal

  • Alliance Grain Terminal – Vancouver BC Port

Processing Facilities

  • FeedMax – Killarney, Manitoba
  • Indian Head Pulse Cleaning Plant – Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • NutraSun Flour Mill – Regina, Saskatchewan

Into the Future

In 2001, Senator Paterson’s grandson, Andrew B. Paterson took over leadership of the family firm. During his younger years, as he learned the ropes at the grain division, Andrew saw many competitors disappear, swallowed up by large, multi-national companies operating on very high volumes and low margins. As CEO of the company Andrew resolved to take a different approach and differentiate his company from the competition.

Andrew’s vision focuses on the commodity that has always been the lifeblood of the company — grain. Since the bulk of Canada’s grain was now flowing west to Vancouver, Andrew sold the shipping division to Canada Steamship Lines in 2002. This move allowed him to grow the company into a highly integrated conglomerate centred around the production, storage, transportation, refinement and sale of grain.

These subsdiaries are numerous and diversified. One of them, Growers International Organic Sales, participates in the enormous boom in the organic food industry by engaging local growers to develop organic produce, and provides assistance during the transition from conventional to organic farming. Another company, NutraSun Foods Ltd., in Regina, produces organic and conventional flour for sale to health conscious shoppers in Canadian supermarkets.

The Paterson conglomerate also branched out into animal nutrition with the opening of the FeedMax mill in Killarney, Manitoba. The mill produces conventional and certified organic animal feed and is one of the largest feed mills in Western Canada. In 2007 Paterson Grain worked with five other independent grain companies to acquire what is now known as the Alliance Grain Terminal in the port of Vancouver. This acquisition gave the company access to foreign export markets without having to go through a competitor’s facilities.

In 2005, the company’s name was changed to Paterson GlobalFoods Inc. to reflect its bold new international presence. With producers and clients on virtually every continent, Paterson GlobalFoods is now truly a world-wide conglomerate. Andrew’s father, Donald S. Paterson, DFC, passed away on May 24, 2006. After running the grain division for so many years, and serving as the company’s Honorary Chairman after he retired, Donald is sorely missed. But Andrew has proven to be an energetic and decisive CEO, and under his leadership Paterson GlobalFoods, has achieved the remarkable honour of being named one of Canada’s “Best Managed Companies” for the last nine years running.

So now the company has come full circle. Founded a century ago by a hard-working and forward-thinking young man named Norman Paterson, it is now once again in the hands of an energetic young Paterson, one who reminds many people of his grandfather. The future will bring more challenges and change for Paterson GlobalFoods. But with a century of successful growth behind him, Andrew Paterson still takes pride in running the family business by the values, vision and passion of his grandfather, Norman McLeod Paterson.

Our Inland Terminals

  • Assiniboia, Saskatchewan
  • Winnipeg North, Manitoba
  • Morris, Manitoba
  • Killarney, Manitoba
  • Binscarth, Manitoba
  • Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • Swift Current, Saskatchewan
  • Dunmore, Alberta
  • Gleichen, Alberta

Our Port Terminal

  • Alliance Grain Terminal – Vancouver BC Port

Processing Facilities

  • FeedMax – Killarney, Manitoba
  • Indian Head Pulse Cleaning Plant – Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • NutraSun Flour Mill – Regina, Saskatchewan

Into the Future

In 2001, Senator Paterson’s grandson, Andrew B. Paterson took over leadership of the family firm. During his younger years, as he learned the ropes at the grain division, Andrew saw many competitors disappear, swallowed up by large, multi-national companies operating on very high volumes and low margins. As CEO of the company Andrew resolved to take a different approach and differentiate his company from the competition.

Andrew’s vision focuses on the commodity that has always been the lifeblood of the company — grain. Since the bulk of Canada’s grain was now flowing west to Vancouver, Andrew sold the shipping division to Canada Steamship Lines in 2002. This move allowed him to grow the company into a highly integrated conglomerate centred around the production, storage, transportation, refinement and sale of grain.

These subsdiaries are numerous and diversified. One of them, Growers International Organic Sales, participates in the enormous boom in the organic food industry by engaging local growers to develop organic produce, and provides assistance during the transition from conventional to organic farming. Another company, NutraSun Foods Ltd., in Regina, produces organic and conventional flour for sale to health conscious shoppers in Canadian supermarkets.

The Paterson conglomerate also branched out into animal nutrition with the opening of the FeedMax mill in Killarney, Manitoba. The mill produces conventional and certified organic animal feed and is one of the largest feed mills in Western Canada. In 2007 Paterson Grain worked with five other independent grain companies to acquire what is now known as the Alliance Grain Terminal in the port of Vancouver. This acquisition gave the company access to foreign export markets without having to go through a competitor’s facilities.

In 2005, the company’s name was changed to Paterson GlobalFoods Inc. to reflect its bold new international presence. With producers and clients on virtually every continent, Paterson GlobalFoods is now truly a world-wide conglomerate. Andrew’s father, Donald S. Paterson, DFC, passed away on May 24, 2006. After running the grain division for so many years, and serving as the company’s Honorary Chairman after he retired, Donald is sorely missed. But Andrew has proven to be an energetic and decisive CEO, and under his leadership Paterson GlobalFoods, has achieved the remarkable honour of being named one of Canada’s “Best Managed Companies” for the last nine years running.

So now the company has come full circle. Founded a century ago by a hard-working and forward-thinking young man named Norman Paterson, it is now once again in the hands of an energetic young Paterson, one who reminds many people of his grandfather. The future will bring more challenges and change for Paterson GlobalFoods. But with a century of successful growth behind him, Andrew Paterson still takes pride in running the family business by the values, vision and passion of his grandfather, Norman McLeod Paterson.

Our Inland Terminals

  • Assiniboia, Saskatchewan
  • Winnipeg North, Manitoba
  • Morris, Manitoba
  • Killarney, Manitoba
  • Binscarth, Manitoba
  • Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • Swift Current, Saskatchewan
  • Dunmore, Alberta
  • Gleichen, Alberta

Our Port Terminal

  • Alliance Grain Terminal – Vancouver BC Port

Processing Facilities

  • FeedMax – Killarney, Manitoba
  • Indian Head Pulse Cleaning Plant – Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • NutraSun Flour Mill – Regina, Saskatchewan

Into the Future

In 2001, Senator Paterson’s grandson, Andrew B. Paterson took over leadership of the family firm. During his younger years, as he learned the ropes at the grain division, Andrew saw many competitors disappear, swallowed up by large, multi-national companies operating on very high volumes and low margins. As CEO of the company Andrew resolved to take a different approach and differentiate his company from the competition.

Andrew’s vision focuses on the commodity that has always been the lifeblood of the company — grain. Since the bulk of Canada’s grain was now flowing west to Vancouver, Andrew sold the shipping division to Canada Steamship Lines in 2002. This move allowed him to grow the company into a highly integrated conglomerate centred around the production, storage, transportation, refinement and sale of grain.

These subsdiaries are numerous and diversified. One of them, Growers International Organic Sales, participates in the enormous boom in the organic food industry by engaging local growers to develop organic produce, and provides assistance during the transition from conventional to organic farming. Another company, NutraSun Foods Ltd., in Regina, produces organic and conventional flour for sale to health conscious shoppers in Canadian supermarkets.

The Paterson conglomerate also branched out into animal nutrition with the opening of the FeedMax mill in Killarney, Manitoba. The mill produces conventional and certified organic animal feed and is one of the largest feed mills in Western Canada. In 2007 Paterson Grain worked with five other independent grain companies to acquire what is now known as the Alliance Grain Terminal in the port of Vancouver. This acquisition gave the company access to foreign export markets without having to go through a competitor’s facilities.

In 2005, the company’s name was changed to Paterson GlobalFoods Inc. to reflect its bold new international presence. With producers and clients on virtually every continent, Paterson GlobalFoods is now truly a world-wide conglomerate. Andrew’s father, Donald S. Paterson, DFC, passed away on May 24, 2006. After running the grain division for so many years, and serving as the company’s Honorary Chairman after he retired, Donald is sorely missed. But Andrew has proven to be an energetic and decisive CEO, and under his leadership Paterson GlobalFoods, has achieved the remarkable honour of being named one of Canada’s “Best Managed Companies” for the last nine years running.

So now the company has come full circle. Founded a century ago by a hard-working and forward-thinking young man named Norman Paterson, it is now once again in the hands of an energetic young Paterson, one who reminds many people of his grandfather. The future will bring more challenges and change for Paterson GlobalFoods. But with a century of successful growth behind him, Andrew Paterson still takes pride in running the family business by the values, vision and passion of his grandfather, Norman McLeod Paterson.

Our Inland Terminals

  • Assiniboia, Saskatchewan
  • Winnipeg North, Manitoba
  • Morris, Manitoba
  • Killarney, Manitoba
  • Binscarth, Manitoba
  • Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • Swift Current, Saskatchewan
  • Dunmore, Alberta
  • Gleichen, Alberta

Our Port Terminal

  • Alliance Grain Terminal – Vancouver BC Port

Processing Facilities

  • FeedMax – Killarney, Manitoba
  • Indian Head Pulse Cleaning Plant – Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • NutraSun Flour Mill – Regina, Saskatchewan

Into the Future

In 2001, Senator Paterson’s grandson, Andrew B. Paterson took over leadership of the family firm. During his younger years, as he learned the ropes at the grain division, Andrew saw many competitors disappear, swallowed up by large, multi-national companies operating on very high volumes and low margins. As CEO of the company Andrew resolved to take a different approach and differentiate his company from the competition.

Andrew’s vision focuses on the commodity that has always been the lifeblood of the company — grain. Since the bulk of Canada’s grain was now flowing west to Vancouver, Andrew sold the shipping division to Canada Steamship Lines in 2002. This move allowed him to grow the company into a highly integrated conglomerate centred around the production, storage, transportation, refinement and sale of grain.

These subsdiaries are numerous and diversified. One of them, Growers International Organic Sales, participates in the enormous boom in the organic food industry by engaging local growers to develop organic produce, and provides assistance during the transition from conventional to organic farming. Another company, NutraSun Foods Ltd., in Regina, produces organic and conventional flour for sale to health conscious shoppers in Canadian supermarkets.

The Paterson conglomerate also branched out into animal nutrition with the opening of the FeedMax mill in Killarney, Manitoba. The mill produces conventional and certified organic animal feed and is one of the largest feed mills in Western Canada. In 2007 Paterson Grain worked with five other independent grain companies to acquire what is now known as the Alliance Grain Terminal in the port of Vancouver. This acquisition gave the company access to foreign export markets without having to go through a competitor’s facilities.

In 2005, the company’s name was changed to Paterson GlobalFoods Inc. to reflect its bold new international presence. With producers and clients on virtually every continent, Paterson GlobalFoods is now truly a world-wide conglomerate. Andrew’s father, Donald S. Paterson, DFC, passed away on May 24, 2006. After running the grain division for so many years, and serving as the company’s Honorary Chairman after he retired, Donald is sorely missed. But Andrew has proven to be an energetic and decisive CEO, and under his leadership Paterson GlobalFoods, has achieved the remarkable honour of being named one of Canada’s “Best Managed Companies” for the last nine years running.

So now the company has come full circle. Founded a century ago by a hard-working and forward-thinking young man named Norman Paterson, it is now once again in the hands of an energetic young Paterson, one who reminds many people of his grandfather. The future will bring more challenges and change for Paterson GlobalFoods. But with a century of successful growth behind him, Andrew Paterson still takes pride in running the family business by the values, vision and passion of his grandfather, Norman McLeod Paterson.

Our Inland Terminals

  • Assiniboia, Saskatchewan
  • Winnipeg North, Manitoba
  • Morris, Manitoba
  • Killarney, Manitoba
  • Binscarth, Manitoba
  • Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • Swift Current, Saskatchewan
  • Dunmore, Alberta
  • Gleichen, Alberta

Our Port Terminal

  • Alliance Grain Terminal – Vancouver BC Port

Processing Facilities

  • FeedMax – Killarney, Manitoba
  • Indian Head Pulse Cleaning Plant – Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • NutraSun Flour Mill – Regina, Saskatchewan

Into the Future

In 2001, Senator Paterson’s grandson, Andrew B. Paterson took over leadership of the family firm. During his younger years, as he learned the ropes at the grain division, Andrew saw many competitors disappear, swallowed up by large, multi-national companies operating on very high volumes and low margins. As CEO of the company Andrew resolved to take a different approach and differentiate his company from the competition.

Andrew’s vision focuses on the commodity that has always been the lifeblood of the company — grain. Since the bulk of Canada’s grain was now flowing west to Vancouver, Andrew sold the shipping division to Canada Steamship Lines in 2002. This move allowed him to grow the company into a highly integrated conglomerate centred around the production, storage, transportation, refinement and sale of grain.

These subsdiaries are numerous and diversified. One of them, Growers International Organic Sales, participates in the enormous boom in the organic food industry by engaging local growers to develop organic produce, and provides assistance during the transition from conventional to organic farming. Another company, NutraSun Foods Ltd., in Regina, produces organic and conventional flour for sale to health conscious shoppers in Canadian supermarkets.

The Paterson conglomerate also branched out into animal nutrition with the opening of the FeedMax mill in Killarney, Manitoba. The mill produces conventional and certified organic animal feed and is one of the largest feed mills in Western Canada. In 2007 Paterson Grain worked with five other independent grain companies to acquire what is now known as the Alliance Grain Terminal in the port of Vancouver. This acquisition gave the company access to foreign export markets without having to go through a competitor’s facilities.

In 2005, the company’s name was changed to Paterson GlobalFoods Inc. to reflect its bold new international presence. With producers and clients on virtually every continent, Paterson GlobalFoods is now truly a world-wide conglomerate. Andrew’s father, Donald S. Paterson, DFC, passed away on May 24, 2006. After running the grain division for so many years, and serving as the company’s Honorary Chairman after he retired, Donald is sorely missed. But Andrew has proven to be an energetic and decisive CEO, and under his leadership Paterson GlobalFoods, has achieved the remarkable honour of being named one of Canada’s “Best Managed Companies” for the last nine years running.

So now the company has come full circle. Founded a century ago by a hard-working and forward-thinking young man named Norman Paterson, it is now once again in the hands of an energetic young Paterson, one who reminds many people of his grandfather. The future will bring more challenges and change for Paterson GlobalFoods. But with a century of successful growth behind him, Andrew Paterson still takes pride in running the family business by the values, vision and passion of his grandfather, Norman McLeod Paterson.

Our Inland Terminals

  • Assiniboia, Saskatchewan
  • Winnipeg North, Manitoba
  • Morris, Manitoba
  • Killarney, Manitoba
  • Binscarth, Manitoba
  • Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • Swift Current, Saskatchewan
  • Dunmore, Alberta
  • Gleichen, Alberta

Our Port Terminal

  • Alliance Grain Terminal – Vancouver BC Port

Processing Facilities

  • FeedMax – Killarney, Manitoba
  • Indian Head Pulse Cleaning Plant – Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • NutraSun Flour Mill – Regina, Saskatchewan

Into the Future

In 2001, Senator Paterson’s grandson, Andrew B. Paterson took over leadership of the family firm. During his younger years, as he learned the ropes at the grain division, Andrew saw many competitors disappear, swallowed up by large, multi-national companies operating on very high volumes and low margins. As CEO of the company Andrew resolved to take a different approach and differentiate his company from the competition.

Andrew’s vision focuses on the commodity that has always been the lifeblood of the company — grain. Since the bulk of Canada’s grain was now flowing west to Vancouver, Andrew sold the shipping division to Canada Steamship Lines in 2002. This move allowed him to grow the company into a highly integrated conglomerate centred around the production, storage, transportation, refinement and sale of grain.

These subsdiaries are numerous and diversified. One of them, Growers International Organic Sales, participates in the enormous boom in the organic food industry by engaging local growers to develop organic produce, and provides assistance during the transition from conventional to organic farming. Another company, NutraSun Foods Ltd., in Regina, produces organic and conventional flour for sale to health conscious shoppers in Canadian supermarkets.

The Paterson conglomerate also branched out into animal nutrition with the opening of the FeedMax mill in Killarney, Manitoba. The mill produces conventional and certified organic animal feed and is one of the largest feed mills in Western Canada. In 2007 Paterson Grain worked with five other independent grain companies to acquire what is now known as the Alliance Grain Terminal in the port of Vancouver. This acquisition gave the company access to foreign export markets without having to go through a competitor’s facilities.

In 2005, the company’s name was changed to Paterson GlobalFoods Inc. to reflect its bold new international presence. With producers and clients on virtually every continent, Paterson GlobalFoods is now truly a world-wide conglomerate. Andrew’s father, Donald S. Paterson, DFC, passed away on May 24, 2006. After running the grain division for so many years, and serving as the company’s Honorary Chairman after he retired, Donald is sorely missed. But Andrew has proven to be an energetic and decisive CEO, and under his leadership Paterson GlobalFoods, has achieved the remarkable honour of being named one of Canada’s “Best Managed Companies” for the last nine years running.

So now the company has come full circle. Founded a century ago by a hard-working and forward-thinking young man named Norman Paterson, it is now once again in the hands of an energetic young Paterson, one who reminds many people of his grandfather. The future will bring more challenges and change for Paterson GlobalFoods. But with a century of successful growth behind him, Andrew Paterson still takes pride in running the family business by the values, vision and passion of his grandfather, Norman McLeod Paterson.

Our Inland Terminals

  • Assiniboia, Saskatchewan
  • Winnipeg North, Manitoba
  • Morris, Manitoba
  • Killarney, Manitoba
  • Binscarth, Manitoba
  • Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • Swift Current, Saskatchewan
  • Dunmore, Alberta
  • Gleichen, Alberta

Our Port Terminal

  • Alliance Grain Terminal – Vancouver BC Port

Processing Facilities

  • FeedMax – Killarney, Manitoba
  • Indian Head Pulse Cleaning Plant – Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • NutraSun Flour Mill – Regina, Saskatchewan

Into the Future

In 2001, Senator Paterson’s grandson, Andrew B. Paterson took over leadership of the family firm. During his younger years, as he learned the ropes at the grain division, Andrew saw many competitors disappear, swallowed up by large, multi-national companies operating on very high volumes and low margins. As CEO of the company Andrew resolved to take a different approach and differentiate his company from the competition.

Andrew’s vision focuses on the commodity that has always been the lifeblood of the company — grain. Since the bulk of Canada’s grain was now flowing west to Vancouver, Andrew sold the shipping division to Canada Steamship Lines in 2002. This move allowed him to grow the company into a highly integrated conglomerate centred around the production, storage, transportation, refinement and sale of grain.

These subsdiaries are numerous and diversified. One of them, Growers International Organic Sales, participates in the enormous boom in the organic food industry by engaging local growers to develop organic produce, and provides assistance during the transition from conventional to organic farming. Another company, NutraSun Foods Ltd., in Regina, produces organic and conventional flour for sale to health conscious shoppers in Canadian supermarkets.

The Paterson conglomerate also branched out into animal nutrition with the opening of the FeedMax mill in Killarney, Manitoba. The mill produces conventional and certified organic animal feed and is one of the largest feed mills in Western Canada. In 2007 Paterson Grain worked with five other independent grain companies to acquire what is now known as the Alliance Grain Terminal in the port of Vancouver. This acquisition gave the company access to foreign export markets without having to go through a competitor’s facilities.

In 2005, the company’s name was changed to Paterson GlobalFoods Inc. to reflect its bold new international presence. With producers and clients on virtually every continent, Paterson GlobalFoods is now truly a world-wide conglomerate. Andrew’s father, Donald S. Paterson, DFC, passed away on May 24, 2006. After running the grain division for so many years, and serving as the company’s Honorary Chairman after he retired, Donald is sorely missed. But Andrew has proven to be an energetic and decisive CEO, and under his leadership Paterson GlobalFoods, has achieved the remarkable honour of being named one of Canada’s “Best Managed Companies” for the last nine years running.

So now the company has come full circle. Founded a century ago by a hard-working and forward-thinking young man named Norman Paterson, it is now once again in the hands of an energetic young Paterson, one who reminds many people of his grandfather. The future will bring more challenges and change for Paterson GlobalFoods. But with a century of successful growth behind him, Andrew Paterson still takes pride in running the family business by the values, vision and passion of his grandfather, Norman McLeod Paterson.

Our Inland Terminals

  • Assiniboia, Saskatchewan
  • Winnipeg North, Manitoba
  • Morris, Manitoba
  • Killarney, Manitoba
  • Binscarth, Manitoba
  • Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • Swift Current, Saskatchewan
  • Dunmore, Alberta
  • Gleichen, Alberta

Our Port Terminal

  • Alliance Grain Terminal – Vancouver BC Port

Processing Facilities

  • FeedMax – Killarney, Manitoba
  • Indian Head Pulse Cleaning Plant – Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • NutraSun Flour Mill – Regina, Saskatchewan

Into the Future

In 2001, Senator Paterson’s grandson, Andrew B. Paterson took over leadership of the family firm. During his younger years, as he learned the ropes at the grain division, Andrew saw many competitors disappear, swallowed up by large, multi-national companies operating on very high volumes and low margins. As CEO of the company Andrew resolved to take a different approach and differentiate his company from the competition.

Andrew’s vision focuses on the commodity that has always been the lifeblood of the company — grain. Since the bulk of Canada’s grain was now flowing west to Vancouver, Andrew sold the shipping division to Canada Steamship Lines in 2002. This move allowed him to grow the company into a highly integrated conglomerate centred around the production, storage, transportation, refinement and sale of grain.

These subsdiaries are numerous and diversified. One of them, Growers International Organic Sales, participates in the enormous boom in the organic food industry by engaging local growers to develop organic produce, and provides assistance during the transition from conventional to organic farming. Another company, NutraSun Foods Ltd., in Regina, produces organic and conventional flour for sale to health conscious shoppers in Canadian supermarkets.

The Paterson conglomerate also branched out into animal nutrition with the opening of the FeedMax mill in Killarney, Manitoba. The mill produces conventional and certified organic animal feed and is one of the largest feed mills in Western Canada. In 2007 Paterson Grain worked with five other independent grain companies to acquire what is now known as the Alliance Grain Terminal in the port of Vancouver. This acquisition gave the company access to foreign export markets without having to go through a competitor’s facilities.

In 2005, the company’s name was changed to Paterson GlobalFoods Inc. to reflect its bold new international presence. With producers and clients on virtually every continent, Paterson GlobalFoods is now truly a world-wide conglomerate. Andrew’s father, Donald S. Paterson, DFC, passed away on May 24, 2006. After running the grain division for so many years, and serving as the company’s Honorary Chairman after he retired, Donald is sorely missed. But Andrew has proven to be an energetic and decisive CEO, and under his leadership Paterson GlobalFoods, has achieved the remarkable honour of being named one of Canada’s “Best Managed Companies” for the last nine years running.

So now the company has come full circle. Founded a century ago by a hard-working and forward-thinking young man named Norman Paterson, it is now once again in the hands of an energetic young Paterson, one who reminds many people of his grandfather. The future will bring more challenges and change for Paterson GlobalFoods. But with a century of successful growth behind him, Andrew Paterson still takes pride in running the family business by the values, vision and passion of his grandfather, Norman McLeod Paterson.

Our Inland Terminals

  • Assiniboia, Saskatchewan
  • Winnipeg North, Manitoba
  • Morris, Manitoba
  • Killarney, Manitoba
  • Binscarth, Manitoba
  • Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • Swift Current, Saskatchewan
  • Dunmore, Alberta
  • Gleichen, Alberta

Our Port Terminal

  • Alliance Grain Terminal – Vancouver BC Port

Processing Facilities

  • FeedMax – Killarney, Manitoba
  • Indian Head Pulse Cleaning Plant – Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • NutraSun Flour Mill – Regina, Saskatchewan

Into the Future

In 2001, Senator Paterson’s grandson, Andrew B. Paterson took over leadership of the family firm. During his younger years, as he learned the ropes at the grain division, Andrew saw many competitors disappear, swallowed up by large, multi-national companies operating on very high volumes and low margins. As CEO of the company Andrew resolved to take a different approach and differentiate his company from the competition.

Andrew’s vision focuses on the commodity that has always been the lifeblood of the company — grain. Since the bulk of Canada’s grain was now flowing west to Vancouver, Andrew sold the shipping division to Canada Steamship Lines in 2002. This move allowed him to grow the company into a highly integrated conglomerate centred around the production, storage, transportation, refinement and sale of grain.

These subsdiaries are numerous and diversified. One of them, Growers International Organic Sales, participates in the enormous boom in the organic food industry by engaging local growers to develop organic produce, and provides assistance during the transition from conventional to organic farming. Another company, NutraSun Foods Ltd., in Regina, produces organic and conventional flour for sale to health conscious shoppers in Canadian supermarkets.

The Paterson conglomerate also branched out into animal nutrition with the opening of the FeedMax mill in Killarney, Manitoba. The mill produces conventional and certified organic animal feed and is one of the largest feed mills in Western Canada. In 2007 Paterson Grain worked with five other independent grain companies to acquire what is now known as the Alliance Grain Terminal in the port of Vancouver. This acquisition gave the company access to foreign export markets without having to go through a competitor’s facilities.

In 2005, the company’s name was changed to Paterson GlobalFoods Inc. to reflect its bold new international presence. With producers and clients on virtually every continent, Paterson GlobalFoods is now truly a world-wide conglomerate. Andrew’s father, Donald S. Paterson, DFC, passed away on May 24, 2006. After running the grain division for so many years, and serving as the company’s Honorary Chairman after he retired, Donald is sorely missed. But Andrew has proven to be an energetic and decisive CEO, and under his leadership Paterson GlobalFoods, has achieved the remarkable honour of being named one of Canada’s “Best Managed Companies” for the last nine years running.

So now the company has come full circle. Founded a century ago by a hard-working and forward-thinking young man named Norman Paterson, it is now once again in the hands of an energetic young Paterson, one who reminds many people of his grandfather. The future will bring more challenges and change for Paterson GlobalFoods. But with a century of successful growth behind him, Andrew Paterson still takes pride in running the family business by the values, vision and passion of his grandfather, Norman McLeod Paterson.

Our Inland Terminals

  • Assiniboia, Saskatchewan
  • Winnipeg North, Manitoba
  • Morris, Manitoba
  • Killarney, Manitoba
  • Binscarth, Manitoba
  • Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • Swift Current, Saskatchewan
  • Dunmore, Alberta
  • Gleichen, Alberta

Our Port Terminal

  • Alliance Grain Terminal – Vancouver BC Port

Processing Facilities

  • FeedMax – Killarney, Manitoba
  • Indian Head Pulse Cleaning Plant – Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • NutraSun Flour Mill – Regina, Saskatchewan

Into the Future

In 2001, Senator Paterson’s grandson, Andrew B. Paterson took over leadership of the family firm. During his younger years, as he learned the ropes at the grain division, Andrew saw many competitors disappear, swallowed up by large, multi-national companies operating on very high volumes and low margins. As CEO of the company Andrew resolved to take a different approach and differentiate his company from the competition.

Andrew’s vision focuses on the commodity that has always been the lifeblood of the company — grain. Since the bulk of Canada’s grain was now flowing west to Vancouver, Andrew sold the shipping division to Canada Steamship Lines in 2002. This move allowed him to grow the company into a highly integrated conglomerate centred around the production, storage, transportation, refinement and sale of grain.

These subsdiaries are numerous and diversified. One of them, Growers International Organic Sales, participates in the enormous boom in the organic food industry by engaging local growers to develop organic produce, and provides assistance during the transition from conventional to organic farming. Another company, NutraSun Foods Ltd., in Regina, produces organic and conventional flour for sale to health conscious shoppers in Canadian supermarkets.

The Paterson conglomerate also branched out into animal nutrition with the opening of the FeedMax mill in Killarney, Manitoba. The mill produces conventional and certified organic animal feed and is one of the largest feed mills in Western Canada. In 2007 Paterson Grain worked with five other independent grain companies to acquire what is now known as the Alliance Grain Terminal in the port of Vancouver. This acquisition gave the company access to foreign export markets without having to go through a competitor’s facilities.

In 2005, the company’s name was changed to Paterson GlobalFoods Inc. to reflect its bold new international presence. With producers and clients on virtually every continent, Paterson GlobalFoods is now truly a world-wide conglomerate. Andrew’s father, Donald S. Paterson, DFC, passed away on May 24, 2006. After running the grain division for so many years, and serving as the company’s Honorary Chairman after he retired, Donald is sorely missed. But Andrew has proven to be an energetic and decisive CEO, and under his leadership Paterson GlobalFoods, has achieved the remarkable honour of being named one of Canada’s “Best Managed Companies” for the last nine years running.

So now the company has come full circle. Founded a century ago by a hard-working and forward-thinking young man named Norman Paterson, it is now once again in the hands of an energetic young Paterson, one who reminds many people of his grandfather. The future will bring more challenges and change for Paterson GlobalFoods. But with a century of successful growth behind him, Andrew Paterson still takes pride in running the family business by the values, vision and passion of his grandfather, Norman McLeod Paterson.

Our Inland Terminals

  • Assiniboia, Saskatchewan
  • Winnipeg North, Manitoba
  • Morris, Manitoba
  • Killarney, Manitoba
  • Binscarth, Manitoba
  • Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • Swift Current, Saskatchewan
  • Dunmore, Alberta
  • Gleichen, Alberta

Our Port Terminal

  • Alliance Grain Terminal – Vancouver BC Port

Processing Facilities

  • FeedMax – Killarney, Manitoba
  • Indian Head Pulse Cleaning Plant – Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • NutraSun Flour Mill – Regina, Saskatchewan

Into the Future

In 2001, Senator Paterson’s grandson, Andrew B. Paterson took over leadership of the family firm. During his younger years, as he learned the ropes at the grain division, Andrew saw many competitors disappear, swallowed up by large, multi-national companies operating on very high volumes and low margins. As CEO of the company Andrew resolved to take a different approach and differentiate his company from the competition.

Andrew’s vision focuses on the commodity that has always been the lifeblood of the company — grain. Since the bulk of Canada’s grain was now flowing west to Vancouver, Andrew sold the shipping division to Canada Steamship Lines in 2002. This move allowed him to grow the company into a highly integrated conglomerate centred around the production, storage, transportation, refinement and sale of grain.

These subsdiaries are numerous and diversified. One of them, Growers International Organic Sales, participates in the enormous boom in the organic food industry by engaging local growers to develop organic produce, and provides assistance during the transition from conventional to organic farming. Another company, NutraSun Foods Ltd., in Regina, produces organic and conventional flour for sale to health conscious shoppers in Canadian supermarkets.

The Paterson conglomerate also branched out into animal nutrition with the opening of the FeedMax mill in Killarney, Manitoba. The mill produces conventional and certified organic animal feed and is one of the largest feed mills in Western Canada. In 2007 Paterson Grain worked with five other independent grain companies to acquire what is now known as the Alliance Grain Terminal in the port of Vancouver. This acquisition gave the company access to foreign export markets without having to go through a competitor’s facilities.

In 2005, the company’s name was changed to Paterson GlobalFoods Inc. to reflect its bold new international presence. With producers and clients on virtually every continent, Paterson GlobalFoods is now truly a world-wide conglomerate. Andrew’s father, Donald S. Paterson, DFC, passed away on May 24, 2006. After running the grain division for so many years, and serving as the company’s Honorary Chairman after he retired, Donald is sorely missed. But Andrew has proven to be an energetic and decisive CEO, and under his leadership Paterson GlobalFoods, has achieved the remarkable honour of being named one of Canada’s “Best Managed Companies” for the last nine years running.

So now the company has come full circle. Founded a century ago by a hard-working and forward-thinking young man named Norman Paterson, it is now once again in the hands of an energetic young Paterson, one who reminds many people of his grandfather. The future will bring more challenges and change for Paterson GlobalFoods. But with a century of successful growth behind him, Andrew Paterson still takes pride in running the family business by the values, vision and passion of his grandfather, Norman McLeod Paterson.

Our Inland Terminals

  • Assiniboia, Saskatchewan
  • Winnipeg North, Manitoba
  • Morris, Manitoba
  • Killarney, Manitoba
  • Binscarth, Manitoba
  • Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • Swift Current, Saskatchewan
  • Dunmore, Alberta
  • Gleichen, Alberta

Our Port Terminal

  • Alliance Grain Terminal – Vancouver BC Port

Processing Facilities

  • FeedMax – Killarney, Manitoba
  • Indian Head Pulse Cleaning Plant – Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • NutraSun Flour Mill – Regina, Saskatchewan

Into the Future

In 2001, Senator Paterson’s grandson, Andrew B. Paterson took over leadership of the family firm. During his younger years, as he learned the ropes at the grain division, Andrew saw many competitors disappear, swallowed up by large, multi-national companies operating on very high volumes and low margins. As CEO of the company Andrew resolved to take a different approach and differentiate his company from the competition.

Andrew’s vision focuses on the commodity that has always been the lifeblood of the company — grain. Since the bulk of Canada’s grain was now flowing west to Vancouver, Andrew sold the shipping division to Canada Steamship Lines in 2002. This move allowed him to grow the company into a highly integrated conglomerate centred around the production, storage, transportation, refinement and sale of grain.

These subsdiaries are numerous and diversified. One of them, Growers International Organic Sales, participates in the enormous boom in the organic food industry by engaging local growers to develop organic produce, and provides assistance during the transition from conventional to organic farming. Another company, NutraSun Foods Ltd., in Regina, produces organic and conventional flour for sale to health conscious shoppers in Canadian supermarkets.

The Paterson conglomerate also branched out into animal nutrition with the opening of the FeedMax mill in Killarney, Manitoba. The mill produces conventional and certified organic animal feed and is one of the largest feed mills in Western Canada. In 2007 Paterson Grain worked with five other independent grain companies to acquire what is now known as the Alliance Grain Terminal in the port of Vancouver. This acquisition gave the company access to foreign export markets without having to go through a competitor’s facilities.

In 2005, the company’s name was changed to Paterson GlobalFoods Inc. to reflect its bold new international presence. With producers and clients on virtually every continent, Paterson GlobalFoods is now truly a world-wide conglomerate. Andrew’s father, Donald S. Paterson, DFC, passed away on May 24, 2006. After running the grain division for so many years, and serving as the company’s Honorary Chairman after he retired, Donald is sorely missed. But Andrew has proven to be an energetic and decisive CEO, and under his leadership Paterson GlobalFoods, has achieved the remarkable honour of being named one of Canada’s “Best Managed Companies” for the last nine years running.

So now the company has come full circle. Founded a century ago by a hard-working and forward-thinking young man named Norman Paterson, it is now once again in the hands of an energetic young Paterson, one who reminds many people of his grandfather. The future will bring more challenges and change for Paterson GlobalFoods. But with a century of successful growth behind him, Andrew Paterson still takes pride in running the family business by the values, vision and passion of his grandfather, Norman McLeod Paterson.

Our Inland Terminals

  • Assiniboia, Saskatchewan
  • Winnipeg North, Manitoba
  • Morris, Manitoba
  • Killarney, Manitoba
  • Binscarth, Manitoba
  • Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • Swift Current, Saskatchewan
  • Dunmore, Alberta
  • Gleichen, Alberta

Our Port Terminal

  • Alliance Grain Terminal – Vancouver BC Port

Processing Facilities

  • FeedMax – Killarney, Manitoba
  • Indian Head Pulse Cleaning Plant – Indian Head, Saskatchewan
  • NutraSun Flour Mill – Regina, Saskatchewan

1882

In 1882, Norman M. Paterson is born in Portage la Prairie, Manitoba.

1902

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Paterson and family, Norman M. Paterson on upper left.

1912

Norman M. Paterson constructed his first grain elevator in 1912, known as elevator “K”. Elevator “K” was one of the very first hospital elevators in Canada.

1915

In 1915 Norman M. Paterson purchased his first ship, a steamship called the D.R. Van Allen. This ship was used to haul off-grade grain to Paterson’s facility for drying.

1920

In October of 1920, workers pose for a photograph during the construction of N.M. Paterson and Company’s terminal in Thunder Bay, Ontario.

1925

By 1925, Norman M. Paterson owned 97 grain elevators located across the country and had become one of the largest grain merchants in Canada.

1929

Officers and Captains of Paterson Steamships taken in 1929 in Toronto, Ontario.

1930

One of the few works of expansion during the Great Depression was the 1,700,000 grain bushel storage annex constructed at Fort William, Ontario in 1930.

1940

Norman McLeod Paterson, at the time of his appointment to the Senate of Canada in 1940.

1942

Paterson makes the transition from the grain business to the war effort. Norman M. Paterson made his company’s shipping fleet and crew available to the Government of Canada for use in hauling materials for the Second World War.

1944

Norman M. Paterson’s business took a costly hit during the Second World War, losing 15 ships and 70 dedicated crewmen.

1947

With the addition of Norman M. Paterson’s sons, John and Donald Paterson, the company adopted a new name – N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited.

1950

By the mid 1950’s, N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited’s shipping fleet was the second largest sailing the Great Lakes of Canada. This remarkable feat of rebuilding was achieved only twelve short years after the ending of the Second World War.

1960

Throughout the “growth years” of the 1950’s and 1960’s, N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited continued to demonstrate its long-standing commitment to Canadian farmers and Canadian agriculture by expanding its network of grain elevators throughout the Canadian prairies.

1976

In 1976, in Orkney, Saskatchewan, the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool announced it planned to shut down the town’s only grain elevator. The local farmers lined up to demonstrate their loyalty to N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited.

1983

On August 11th, 1983, only eight days after his 100th birthday, Senator Norman M. Paterson died peacefully in his home in Ottawa, Ontario. Norman M. Paterson’s passing was a great loss to the Canadian business world, and the Mayor of Thunder Bay, Ontario expressed the thoughts of many Canadians in describing him as one of “the great captains of industry in this country.”

1984

By 1984 N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited’s grain division was operating 78 country elevators located at 60 different locations across the Canadian prairies. The total combined storage capacity was 235,580 tonnes.

1985

On April 18, 1985 the M.V. Paterson was launched.  The M.V. Paterson had a total length of 736 feet, a beam of almost 76 feet and a shipping capacity of 32,350 tonnes.  To this day, the M.V. Paterson remains the largest ship to ever navigate the Great Lakes Seaway.

1992

In 1992, Norman M. Paterson’s grandson Andrew B. Paterson launched the first “Inland Export Terminal” in Indian Head, Saskatchewan. This revolutionary concept allowed for the cleaning of grain on the prairies rather than at seaport. Completion of this facility marked the beginning of Paterson’s consecutive construction of nine (9) separate inland export terminals, all of which are located at key locations across the Canadian prairies and each includes a minimum rail load out capability of 112 cars.

1998

In 1998, N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited created its own trucking company, Truck Freight International, for the handling and transportation of bulk agriculture commodities. This photograph shows the first truck included in Truck Freight International’s fleet.

1999

N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited continued to expand its presence across the Canadian prairies by constructing new, fully modernized Inland Grain Terminals. In 1999, PTC Construction Ltd. finished building Paterson Grain’s new Winnipeg North inland grain terminal located in Winnipeg, Manitoba.

2001

With the leadership of Andrew B. Paterson, N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited branched into animal nutrition and opened a feed mill in Killarney, Manitoba in 2001.  FeedMax Corp. specializes in the production of conventional and organic animal feed.

2003

Led by Andrew B. Paterson, as sole shareholder, the company shifted its focus in 2003 towards a bold and new direction; as a result, N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited completed the sale of its marine division to Canada Steamship Lines, a Canadian shipping company owned by the former Prime Minister of Canada, Mr. Paul Martin.

2003

In 2003, NutraSun Foods Ltd., a Regina based flour mill, was acquired by N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited. NutraSun Foods Ltd. mills both organic and conventional flours for use in a variety of flour products including bakery mixes, dough conditioners and whole grain products.

2005

To reflect its presence in the global agri-business marketplace, N.M. Paterson & Sons Limited changed its name to Paterson GlobalFoods Inc. in 2005.

2007

In 2007 Paterson GlobalFoods Inc. led the joint venture purchase of Alliance Grain Terminal Ltd., a 102,000 tonne capacity export grain terminal located on the south shore of the Burrard Inlet in the scenic Port of Vancouver. The facility serves as a strategic gateway for the export of Canadian grain into the Asia-Pacific market.

2008

In 2008, PTC Construction Ltd. completed construction of a new 28,000 tonne Inland Export Terminal in Assiniboia, Saskatchewan. This terminal is equipped with two separate receiving driveways and is fully capable of loading a 130 car unit train in less than 8 hours.

2010

In 2010, PTC Construction Ltd. started construction on NutraGro’s new state-of-the-art high volume fertilizer distribution center located in Winnipeg, Manitoba.  The facility incorporates a 130 car rail loop track design and serves as a high volume distribution outlet for top-rated fertilizer manufacturers across North America.

2011

PTC Construction Ltd. completed the construction of Paterson Grain’s Long Plain inland export terminal in Gleichen, Alberta.  This facility features an innovative 134 car rail loop track design which allows for the fastest train loading times ever seen on the Canadian prairies.

2012

In 2012, PTC Construction Ltd. built two separate large scale expansion projects. The Killarney, Manitoba and Dunmore, Alberta terminals each received the addition of four large steel grain storage tanks which increased the storage capacity of each terminal by over 32,000 tonnes.

2013

In time for the bountiful Fall harvest of 2013, PTC Construction Ltd. completed construction of flat storage infrastructure at Paterson Grain’s terminal locations in Morris, Manitoba and Winnipeg, Manitoba.

2014

In 2014, PTC Construction Ltd. began construction of a state of the art fertilizer distribution centre at Paterson Grain’s farm services centre in Swift Current, Saskatchewan.  In addition, Paterson Grain’s inland terminal in Winnipeg, Manitoba completed the construction of its second flat storage site, providing 40,000 tonnes of additional storage capacity.

2015

Paterson Grain began an expansion project at its terminal in Assiniboia, Saskatchewan, increasing capacity by over 28,000 tonnes.  In addition, Paterson Grain opened its doors to Swift Current farm services facility’s new fertilizer distribution centre.  PTC Construction Ltd. began NutraGro’s expansion of its fertilizer plant in Winnipeg, Manitoba, which includes a second load-out line and 20,000 tonnes of additional storage capacity.